Alexandra Tompson - ADF The problem with screening for Down's Syndrome
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01/10/2018

Alexandra Tompson - ADF The problem with screening for Down's Syndrome

Alexandra Tompson, Legal Analyst and Veritas Scholar at ADF International, reflects on the issue of Down's syndrome screening. Alexandra Tompson serves ADF International as legal analyst and Veritas Scholar in Vienna, Austria. In her role, Tompson promotes religious freedom, sanctity of life, and marriage and the family, while supporting the EU team in Brussels, the Council of Europe team in Strasbourg, and the United Nations team in Geneva. Prior to joining ADF International, Tompson worked as an external relations officer for the Jerome Lejeune Foundation in Paris, France, where she advocated for the right to life, specifically of the unborn screened with Downs Syndrome. About 750 babies are born each year with Downs Syndrome in the UK, and there are an estimated 40,000 people living with the condition. Those with Downs Syndrome today lead fulfilling, meaningful and valuable lives, and yet in Britain today - a 'screening out' programme is being adopted where mothers are pressured to undergo pre-natal testing on their unborn children to test for Downs Syndrome which usually results in the death of unborn children with Downs Syndrome via abortion. One can see here the similarities between the Nazi regime where those who were of 'non-Aryan origin' where forced into abortions in order to eradicate them; just as those with Downs Syndrome are trying to be eradicated today. Tompson, discusses all of these points in her conference talk, along with an in-depth investigation into non-invasive testing, the right to life of all under international law and a refutation of the arguments in favour of pre-natal testing for diseases.